• Cocktails,  Poetry

    Thanksgiving Cocktails, Truman Capote, Puritan Poetry

    A few notes for your Thanksgiving: a holiday examination, Mumm champagne, an old-fashioned cocktail from Garden & Gun, the French 75 (its history and variants), Puritan poetry (no Puritans = no Thanksgiving), Truman Capote and Loudon Wainwright III. First, while still sober, take this test from Liquor.com: From the formidable Emily Arden Wells  at Gastronomista, a Cocktail Friendsgiving with G.H. Mumm Champagne.   Although I usually repair to gin drinks, this recipe for an old-fashioned from Garden & Gun is the real thing: If, like me, you do not care for Bloody Marys, a French 75 — essentially, a cocktail made with gin (or sometimes cognac), simple syrup, fresh lemon…

  • Controlled Substances Act,  Drugs,  Poetry,  Trials, Judges and Jurors

    Pill Mills, Poppy Flowers, Dead Poets and the Human Resources Department

    Having been through a seven-week federal criminal “pill mill” trial, I think a lot about enforcement of the Controlled Substances Act and its effect on physicians.  Aggressive enforcement effects others in healthcare as well, including management: “It’s very hard for medical professionals and those in upper management, such as hospital CFOs, CEOs, and CMOs, to see themselves as criminals,” says Jack Sharman, partner at Lightfoot, Franklin, and White, a law firm headquartered in Birmingham, AL. “This difficulty to perceive what someone else might think merits a criminal investigation impedes judgment and slows internal response.” While physicians might not see themselves as criminals for managing patients’ pain or making sure they…

  • Crime Fiction,  Deferred Prosecution Agreements,  Grand Jury,  Lawyers,  Poetry,  SEC,  Style and Grammar

    The Freedom of Little Joe Cartwright: Tax Crime, Edgar Allan Poe, Noir Film and Lacrosse

    Notes for the week. Prosecuting Individuals Federal criminal tax lawyer Jack Townsend blogs at Federal Tax Crimes.  Here is his note on Prosecuting Corporate Employees, particularly in the tax context: I have previously blogged on Professor Brandon Garrett (UVA Law) who have carved out an academic niche on how the Government deals with corporate crime, particularly large corporate crime (the too big to jail group). See e.g., Judge Jed Rakoff Reviews Brandon Garrett’s Book on Too Big to Jail: How Prosecutors Compromise with Corporations (Federal Tax Crimes Blog 2/10/15), here. At the risk of oversimplifying his arguments, I summarize them in part relevant to this blog entry: When the Government goes…

  • Poetry

    Liberty and Edward Thomas

    “Liberty” is one of the foundational concepts of the American enterprise, individual liberty in particular. To the white-collar practitioner (and client), the concept of liberty takes on a special urgency. Edward Thomas was born in Lambeth, London, on March 3, 1878. His books include The Woodland Life (1896), In Pursuit of Spring (1914), and Last Poems (1918). Thomas died in World War I at the battle of Arras on April 9, 1917.  “Liberty” was published in Thomas’s book Poems (H. Holt & company, 1917). Liberty by Edward Thomas (1878-1917) The last light has gone out of the world, except This moonlight lying on the grass like frost Beyond the brink…

  • Cocktails,  Crime Fiction,  Poetry,  Style and Grammar

    Okay, So It’s A Lurid Book Cover: Summer Weekend Cocktails, Dylan Thomas on YouTube, Good Writing and Great Music

    Our notes for Friday, beginning with cocktails; moving through literature; ending with music. Brown Whisky Is Not Just For Winter.  From the New York Times, some summer drinks using brown booze. And Old-Fashioneds Aren’t Always Dark.  From Gastronomista, a tequila old-fashioned that actually sounds good. Go Scandinavian.  As long as we’re discussing traditional cocktails with non-traditional spirits, I might try an aquavit Manhattan (if I can find some aquavit) (from Saveur.com). Movie Booze.  For movie buffs, from Liquor.com, a list of The 6 Most Influential Drink Orders of All Time. There’s Always Time For Good Writing.  Some superior prose passages from “After Deadline.” Welsh Poetry Is Good For You.  From the…

  • Law Practice Management,  Lawyers,  Poetry

    “Compensation” | Paul Laurence Dunbar

    Compensation is a matter dear to lawyers’ hearts, white-collar and otherwise.  Here’s a poem (via www.poets.org) by Paul Laurence Dunbar: Compensation Because I had loved so deeply, Because I had loved so long, God in His great compassion Gave me the gift of song. Because I have loved so vainly, And sung with such faltering breath, The Master in infinite mercy Offers the boon of Death. Paul Laurence Dunbar was born in Dayton, Ohio, in 1872. He wrote numerous books of poems, including Majors and Minors (1895), as well as several novels and a play. He died in 1906 in Dayton, Ohio.  “Compensation” was originally published in Dunbar’s 1905 collection Lyrics of Sunshine…

  • Appeals,  Poetry,  Theology

    “Appellate Jurisdiction” | Marianne Moore (1887-1972)

    For pondering our appeals of all sorts.   Appellate Jurisdiction by Marianne Moore Fragments of sin are a part of me. New brooms shall sweep clean the heart of me.       Shall they? Shall they? When this light life shall have passed away, God shall redeem me, a castaway.       Shall He? Shall He?   About This Poem “Appellate Jurisdiction” by Marianne Moore was published in the May 1915 issue of Poetry along with four other poems by Moore. Marianne Moore was born in Saint Louis, Missouri, on November 15, 1887. Moore, a former Chancellor of the Academy of American Poets, was the recipient of the…

  • Crime Fiction,  Poetry

    A Poem Fit For White-Collar Crime: In the City of Night

    A poem, In the City of Night, by John Gould Fletcher, that’s fit for white-collar crime: In the City of Night by John Gould Fletcher (To the Memory of Edgar Allan Poe) City of night, Wrap me in your folds of shadow. City of twilight, City that projects into the west, City whose columns rest upon the sunset, city of square, threatening masses blocking out the light: City of twilight, Wrap me in your folds of shadow. City of midnight, city that the full moon overflows, city where the cats prowl and the closed iron dust-carts go rattling through the shadows: City of midnight, Wrap me in your folds of…