• Grand Jury,  Search Warrants

    Search Warrants, Subpoenas, and Danish Existentialism

    The “what-to-do-when-the-FBI-shows up” spiel is, admittedly, a well-worn trope on the white-collar panel-discussion circuit, a talk accompanied by coffee in styrofoam cups (in the morning) or dry chicken-breasts on buffet steam-tables (in the evening).  Unless the audience is virginal in its dalliance with law enforcement, the shock effect of talking about search warrants is lost, and the delivery becomes boring, leading us to that nineteenth-century Danish existentialist, Soren Kierkegaard. Yet, the subject is a serious one for corporations and for individual businesspersons.  As we have noted before, law-enforcement techniques — including search warrants — that were once limited to organized crime, drug dealers or motorcycle gangs are now used with…

  • Search Warrants

    Search Warrants and Russia Raids

    The execution of a search warrant on a residence owned by Paul Manafort, President Trump’s former campaign director, raises some interesting questions.  Search warrants are rarely necessary in white-collar cases, yet their use seems to be more and more common. Here was my take on Brian Williams’s MSNBC show The 11th Hour: As I told Michael Schmidt of the New York Times: “A search warrant is very bracing for the person who is being searched,” said Jack Sharman, the former special counsel to the House Banking Committee during its Whitewater investigation of President Bill Clinton in the 1990s. “It’s very invasive and sends a loud statement from the prosecutors to the…

  • Evidence,  Fourth Amendment

    Subpoenas, Search Warrants and the Dead

    The Grateful Dead were succinct about it:   “Got a tip they’re gonna kick the door in again/I’d like to get some sleep before I travel/But if you got a warrant, I guess you’re gonna come in” (from “Truckin”) (1970). Here is a piece about subpoenas and search warrants for risk managers.  Short and free. Videos included.  Also free.  No Jerry Garcia, though: On May 2, Jack Sharman spoke at the Spring Meeting of the Alabama Society for Healthcare Risk Management. As a member of the Firm’s White-Collar Criminal Defense and Corporate Investigations practice, Jack has represented physicians, physician-practices, nurses and other healthcare providers in criminal, civil and administrative investigations. Jack spoke…

  • Compliance

    ABA White-Collar Crime Committee Winter/Spring 2014 Newsletter

    Here’s the ABA White-Collar Crime Committee Winter Spring 2014 Newsletter.         Good articles on: INTERNATIONAL WHITE COLLAR CRIME AND DEFERRED PROSECUTION AGREEMENTS CORPORATE COMPLIANCE PROGRAMS IN THE UNITED STATES AND IN ITALY: ARE THEY THE SAME? GIVE ME BACK MY BOOKS AND RECORDS: APPLICATION OF RULE 41(G) IN RESPONSE TO FEDERAL SEARCH AND SEIZURE WARRANTS HOT ISSUES IN CIVIL ASSET FORFEITURES THE BOARD’S ROLE IN ANTI-CORRUPTION COMPLIANCE: GUARDIAN AND GUIDE SEC ARGUES FOR BROAD CONSTRUCTION OF DODD-FRANK ACT WHISTLEBLOWER ANTI-RETALIATION PROVISION DOES THE GREEN LIGHT MEAN GO?: WILL SEC’S NEW RULES FOR SMALL OFFERINGS INCREASE STATE ENFORCEMENT ACTIONS? NEW PROPOSED RULES INCREASE GOVERNMENT CONTRACTORS’ RESPONSIBILITIES FOR PREVENTING HUMAN…

  • Evidence,  FCPA,  Legal Education

    Breaking Bad, All the Time: White Collar Crime for Business Lawyers

      The Network of Trial Law Firms is an excellent CLE vehicle.  Here’s a Sharman White Collar Panel Video of a Network panel about white-collar issues for civil lawyers — me, Jackie Arango of Akerman Senterfit (Miami), Joel Neckers of Wheeler Trigg (Denver) and Gerry Leone of Noxon Peabody (Boston).  Here’s the blurb from the Network program: No one thinks of themselves, their employees or their company as “criminals.” On the other hand, Walter White was once just a chemistry teacher. The lines between what are business-crime problems and what are traditional corporate civil issues — compliance, due diligence, regulatory recordkeeping and permitting, whistleblowers, confidentiality, privilege and indemnification — have…

  • Compliance,  Fifth Amendment,  International

    The Border, Searches and the Digital Devices of Executives and Employees

    Here’s a story (via @nytimes) about how the border is a back door for device searches. There is, of course, a “border exception” to the Fourth Amendment, a constitutional doctrine that came of age when national physical borders were also, usually, information-borders as well.  Although the discussion in the article takes place in the national-security context, it’s worth American companies giving more careful thought to how they address the way their executives and employees work and travel.  Employees usually love using their own devices and storing company data in ways that are readily accessible to and productive for them. At the border, though, all that corporate data is free game.…