Come Fly With Me: Airplane Drinks, Beer For Breakfast, Cocktail Science and Socrates

Our notes on cocktails this Friday.

"And then he said, 'Business class, my ass.'"

“And then he said, ‘Business class, my ass.'”

From Gastronomista, an Avua Cachaca Pam Am cocktail:

I was recently introduced to Avuá Cachaça, a relatively new cachaça on the market.  After a boozy night out on the town touring some of New York City’s best bars, including Sasha Petrosky’s famed Milk & Honey, I’m convinced that this is a bottle I want to keep in my library of libations.

 

 

Please place your seats and trays in their upright and locked position.

Coffee?  Tea?  Something stronger?

Coffee? Tea? Something stronger?

 

Come Fly With Me (1958)

Come Fly With Me (1958)

Indeed, on YouTube, “Come Fly With Me” by Frank Sinatra.

 

 

 

 

In a frosty mug, please.

In a frosty mug, please.

 

 

 

 

 

From Saveur, for those who like it dark and early in the day, here’s The Brew: Founder’s Kentucky Breakfast Stout:

One of the biggest deals for craft beer enthusiasts is the annual spring release of Founders Brewing Company’s “highly acclaimed” KBS, or Kentucky Breakfast Stout. The outrageous 11.2% bourbon barrel-aged beer attracts fans from all over the country to Founders’ home base of Grand Rapids, Michigan, where they line up for hours on end for short pours of the inky, robust brew. The beer’s release has become so popular that Founders issues tickets for the event, and this year, rather than pour it just at the brewery’s taproom, they decided to celebrate with a week-long party throughout greater Grand Rapids.

Gabriella Mlynarczyk’s Smoky Brown-Butter Old-Fashioned, Jamie Boudreau’s Chocolate Milk and Dave Arnold’s Italiano Stalliano.  Credit Sarah Anne Ward for The New York Times. Food stylist: Suzanne Lenzer. Prop stylist: Paola Andrea.

Gabriella Mlynarczyk’s Smoky Brown-Butter Old-Fashioned, Jamie Boudreau’s Chocolate Milk and Dave Arnold’s Italiano Stalliano.
Credit Sarah Anne Ward for The New York Times. Food stylist: Suzanne Lenzer. Prop stylist: Paola Andrea.

From the New York Times, we have Cocktail Science, Simplified.  Booze with cookies, though, is not to my taste.

 

"This gin is awfully bitter."

“This gin is awfully bitter.”

Now, this is more like it.  From the Huffington Post and Liquor.com, here are 12 cocktails to drink before you die and 5 essential spring gin cocktails, including the Ramos gin fizz.

 

 

 

 

 


Friday Cocktails | Drinking In London, Watching Your Vocabulary and Freezing Your Cubes

To begin the weekend: London’s top cocktail bars, a whiskey glossary and a history of ice cubes.

The Connaught.

The Connaught.

London Calling. The drinks aren’t cheap, but here’s a look from The Guardian at the top 10 classic cocktail bars in London:

London’s cocktail scene is booming, with new bars opening all the time – but if you want to treat yourself to a flawless classic then head to a hotel bar. Cocktail expert Jared Brown chooses the best, plus some cutting edge places where top mixologists are producing drinks destined to become the new classics.

 

"Vermouth" before "whiskey" but after "gin."

“Vermouth” before “whiskey” but after “gin.”

Definitions.  From the folks at Saveur, a handy whiskey glossary.

"All I said was that my martini wasn't cold enough."

“All I said was that my martini wasn’t cold enough.”

Cutting Much Ice.  And, in what may the best tangentially-related article on cocktails, here is Freezer Harvest: A History of Ice Cubes, from Modern Farmer magazine:

While it’s usually challenging to trace the origins of specific cocktails (with all the drinking the details get lost), we understand pretty well how ice got into all of them. It started when one entrepreneur named Frederic Tudor had the idea to harvest lake and pond ice from New England states and sell it in hotter countries. He began sending ships full of ice from Boston to Martinique and Cuba in 1806, expanded the business to Southern US states, and his ice reached as far as India. In the process he created the ice trade.

Up until that point many cocktails were made with added water, but it didn’t take long for the concept of “cooling drinks” with ice to catch on. Different shapes of ice were specified for different drinks: lumps of ice for cocktails, shaved ice for juleps, and cobblestone ice for cobblers. These new drinks were so delicious it seems every foreign visitor to the U.S. in the early 1800s commented on the marvelous cocktails in this country. Soon, “American bars” opened up in big cities around the world serving these refreshing and exotic delicacies. But the glory days of the cocktail in America came to an end in 1920.

The thirteen years of Prohibition pretty much killed the art of bartending in America, and it took decades for things  to begin to turn back around. It wasn’t until after 2000 that a critical mass of American bartenders began looking to drink books from Frederic Tudor’s time, and classic cocktails came back into fashion. High-end bars gave better attention to each element in the cocktail, from the base spirit to the type of sugar used in the simple syrup, and eventually to the shape and size of ice best-suited to each drink. The problem was that by then nobody harvested ponds anymore, and machine-made ice provided one size of cube for all types of drinks in most bars.

I’m going home to check the freezer.