• Poetry

    Liberty and Edward Thomas

    “Liberty” is one of the foundational concepts of the American enterprise, individual liberty in particular. To the white-collar practitioner (and client), the concept of liberty takes on a special urgency. Edward Thomas was born in Lambeth, London, on March 3, 1878. His books include The Woodland Life (1896), In Pursuit of Spring (1914), and Last Poems (1918). Thomas died in World War I at the battle of Arras on April 9, 1917.  “Liberty” was published in Thomas’s book Poems (H. Holt & company, 1917). Liberty by Edward Thomas (1878-1917) The last light has gone out of the world, except This moonlight lying on the grass like frost Beyond the brink…

  • Law Practice Management,  Lawyers,  Poetry

    “Compensation” | Paul Laurence Dunbar

    Compensation is a matter dear to lawyers’ hearts, white-collar and otherwise.  Here’s a poem (via www.poets.org) by Paul Laurence Dunbar: Compensation Because I had loved so deeply, Because I had loved so long, God in His great compassion Gave me the gift of song. Because I have loved so vainly, And sung with such faltering breath, The Master in infinite mercy Offers the boon of Death. Paul Laurence Dunbar was born in Dayton, Ohio, in 1872. He wrote numerous books of poems, including Majors and Minors (1895), as well as several novels and a play. He died in 1906 in Dayton, Ohio.  “Compensation” was originally published in Dunbar’s 1905 collection Lyrics of Sunshine…

  • Appeals,  Poetry,  Theology

    “Appellate Jurisdiction” | Marianne Moore (1887-1972)

    For pondering our appeals of all sorts.   Appellate Jurisdiction by Marianne Moore Fragments of sin are a part of me. New brooms shall sweep clean the heart of me.       Shall they? Shall they? When this light life shall have passed away, God shall redeem me, a castaway.       Shall He? Shall He?   About This Poem “Appellate Jurisdiction” by Marianne Moore was published in the May 1915 issue of Poetry along with four other poems by Moore. Marianne Moore was born in Saint Louis, Missouri, on November 15, 1887. Moore, a former Chancellor of the Academy of American Poets, was the recipient of the…

  • Crime Fiction,  Poetry

    A Poem Fit For White-Collar Crime: In the City of Night

    A poem, In the City of Night, by John Gould Fletcher, that’s fit for white-collar crime: In the City of Night by John Gould Fletcher (To the Memory of Edgar Allan Poe) City of night, Wrap me in your folds of shadow. City of twilight, City that projects into the west, City whose columns rest upon the sunset, city of square, threatening masses blocking out the light: City of twilight, Wrap me in your folds of shadow. City of midnight, city that the full moon overflows, city where the cats prowl and the closed iron dust-carts go rattling through the shadows: City of midnight, Wrap me in your folds of…

  • Crime Fiction

    Crime and T.S. Eliot

    Today (September 26th) is the birthday of American-born (but eventually British-subject) poet T.S. Eliot (1888-1965).  He wrote little about crime except Murder in the Cathedral (1935): Now is my way clear, now is the meaning plain: Temptation shall not come in this kind again. The last temptation is the greatest treason: To do the right deed for the wrong reason. -Thomas, Part I And here’s one about a criminal cat, Macavity: Macavity’s a Mystery Cat: he’s called the Hidden Paw— For he’s the master criminal who can defy the Law. He’s the bafflement of Scotland Yard, the Flying Squad’s despair: For when they reach the scene of crime—Macavity’s not there!…