Flipboard Spotlight | White Collar | Nice Tie.

Flipboard

Flipboard

You may use Flipboard as a nifty way to organize news and media in which you have an interest.  (If you don’t use Flipboard, try it).

For mysterious reasons, Flipboard decided to do a “spotlight” on me as a “Magazine Maker.”  (“Magazines” are the way you organize stories in Flipboard).  Here is the story: Attorney and White Collar Wire Blogger Jack Sharman

Nice tie.

Nice tie.

My name is Jack Sharman. I’m a lawyer who blogs at White Collar Wire about white-collar criminal defense, crime fiction, cocktails and theology.

My love of narrative led me to all of those topics. Juror, reader, drinker, sinner: everyone needs a good story.

I use Flipboard “inbound” as a newsfeed and “outbound” as an aggregator of articles, blog posts and news items. I have six magazines. They range from the professional (White Collar) to the curious: Noir, for example, is an offshoot of Crime Fiction.

The first article I flipped was an article in The New York Times about the SEC (the market regulator, not the real SEC).

My favorite topic on Flipboard is white-collar crime and government investigations, but I also spend time with film noir and literature, nice resorts and lacrosse.

The best article I’ve read all week was about the jury in the Etan Patz murder trial. I know little of the record in the case, but the jurors in their post-trial interview demonstrated remarkable respect for the process and for each other.

A magazine I found on Flipboard that’s made my life better? I can’t say that any magazine has made my life “better,” but I reflect on the images in Abandoned But Not Forgotten (Gianni Mazzetti), a collection of photographs of abandoned houses, businesses, factories and other structures. It’s like Ecclesiastes for social media.

My media diet consists of Twitter lists, Tumblr, ESPN and work-pertinent blogs such as 500 Pearl Street (Walt Pavlo), White Collar Watch (Professor Peter J. Henning) and White Collar Crime Prof Blog (Professors Ellen S. Podgor and Lucian E. Dervan, and defense lawyers Lawrence S. Goldman and Solomon L. Wisenberg).

Other hits: Rap Sheet (J. Kingston Pierce) (crime fiction), Mockingbird (culture and the theology of grace), Gastronomista (Emily Arden Wells) (cocktails), About Last Night (Terry Teachout and the arts) and After Deadline (Philip B. Corbett) (writing style, usage and grammar from the New York Times). The Daily Office Lectionary, an app that tracks the Anglican cycle of prayer, is a useful tool for early morning meditation and prayer, as is the ESV Bible app. Music comes from Soundhound.

A unique productivity tip of mine is to drink no coffee and review no email before reflecting on what is actually important, rather than what the world tells me is important. (I’m not sure how “unique” that tip is, but it works better than the alternative.)

Here are the magazines I curate.  Follow any (or all).

View my Flipboard Magazine.

View my Flipboard Magazine.

View my Flipboard Magazine.

View my Flipboard Magazine.

View my Flipboard Magazine.

View my Flipboard Magazine.


The Drinking Reader, Our Cocktails Magazine, Tom Jones and Other Weekend Matters

Cocktails on Flipboard.

Cocktails on Flipboard.

White Collar Wire supports cocktails.

As part of that effort, I have a magazine on Flipboard called (helpfully) “Cocktails.”  Follow here, read on and use good ice.

Two items we focus on — books and cocktails — come together in How to Build a Solid Drinking Library, by New York Times writer (and bartender) Rosie Schaap:

Are there places I like as much as great bars? Yes: great bookshops. And if I had to pick a favorite in the latter category, it’s Dog Ears Book Barn in the little town of Hoosick, N.Y. Conveniently, it’s just a little ways down Route 7 from the Man of Kent, one of America’s best bars. A couple of hours spent digging through Dog Ears for treasure, then bringing those books to the Man of Kent and perusing them over a few pints for a few more hours? That’s what I call a perfect day.

Read the entire piece here.

All you need (courtesy of Gear Patrol).

All you need (courtesy of Gear Patrol).

On the subject of cocktails, absinthe has made a comeback, as shown in Gear Patrol‘s piece on How to Drink Absinthe Like a Gentleman.

Absinthe’s history mirrors the way it’s meant to be prepared: a mix of the misunderstood and the legitimately unusual. For most of its existence, the spirit has been slandered, ostracized and, in rarer cases, revered. It’s been dragged across borders, masqueraded as other liquors, aspersed with hallucination claims and — since its ban was lifted in America in 2007 — the spirit has been secretly embracing it all.

“There’s a tradition. There’s a lure to the preparation of absinthe”, says Will Elliot, a bartender at Brooklyn’s Maison Premiere, an oyster and cocktail den with the allure of a New Orleans haunt. Absinthe, at 68 percent alcohol, is a compacted spirit. Once diluted with water, the essential oils and flavors loosen to reveal the drink’s nuances. Preparing an absinthe drink involves combining botanicals, flavors and aromatic elements, Elliot says. “It’s not the sort of spirit that you just toss back.” As for lighting it on fire, which often is brought up in discussions on how absinthe’s served, “You wouldn’t…that’s really damaging the alcohol”, Elliot says. He got behind the bar to debunk some myths and walk us through two traditional absinthe drinks — a drip and a frappe — and a new twist on an old cocktail.

The Martinez (via The Cabinet Rooms)

The Martinez (via The Cabinet Rooms)

From the The Cabinet Rooms blog, a recipe for the Martinez, a precursor to the modern martini:

Continuing our exploration into the world of gin, we’ve been perusing classic gin-based cocktails this week. One dating back to the 1880’s is the Martinez; a smooth and refreshing drink, packed full of herbal aromatics. Usually made by mixing gin, vermouth and bitters with either maraschino liqueur or orange curaçao, this drink is a great alternative to the Martini. We love the combination of the gin’s botanicals with the fruitier notes of the vermouth and sweetness of the maraschino. Here we’ve used Burleigh’s London Dry and garnished with a black cherry, soaked in a rich Kirsch syrup, for a touch of added luxury.

A frosty one.

A frosty one.

From the Garden & Gun blog, a video recipe  for a modern mint julep.

From The Telegraph, a review of fancy bitters:

“You’re writing about bitters – great beers!” my husband said. But no, with respect to him and Britain’s brewers, I’m going to talk about something far more chic and high fashion. And bitters – those little, apothecary-like bottles of intensely aromatic botanical tinctures – are about as on-trend as you can get right now.

This follows on from the premium gin craze, as what could be better than bitters to dash in your G&T? Angostura, the brand that most of us know, is good stuff, but do branch out and try other, distinctive smaller-batch bitters, such as the extraordinary range made by The Bitter Truth.

Finally, a clip of Tom Jones singing “She’s A Lady,” just because we can: