The Five Best Ways for Your Client’s Employees to Get Indicted

A glass of ice water, please.

A glass of ice water, please.

The nice folks at the Birmingham Bar Association (and white-collar criminal defense lawyer Steve Shaw in particular) invited me to deliver a lunchtime CLE on a white-collar subject of my choice.  The topic ended up being “The Five Best Ways for Your Client’s Employees to Get Indicted.”

One could come up with more ways your client’s employees could get indicted, but life is short.

Hunting for 18 U.S.C. Section 1001.

Hunting for 18 U.S.C. Section 1001.

Here is the handout: The Five Best Ways for Your Client’s Employees to Get Indicted. Download it.  It’s not legal advice, but it has some fairly useful material about bribery, obstruction and honest-services fraud in the Eleventh Circuit, as well as quotes from Men In Black (1997).  We spent a fair amount of time on practical considerations in working with businesspeople involved in white-collar investigations, including this piece: Stalking Horses, Pitchfork Crowds, Narrow Neckties, Mr. Rogers’s Slippers and Indicted Employees: 6 Steps To Dodge Being Deweyed.

All about the ratings.

All about the ratings.

And, there was even a caution against the “Efrem Zimbalist, Jr. Syndrome,” named after the star of the old television series The FBI.  Watch this 140-second video on the Efrem Zimbalist, Jr. Syndrome.


Wine, White-Collar Crime and You.

A conference with elan.

A conference with elan.

The ABA Southeastern White Collar Crime Institute near Atlanta on September 10 and 11, 2015  is a good event at a nice place (Chateau Elan) for white-collar practitioners.

Sharman speaking again?

Sharman speaking again?

They are letting me speak at the conference, but do not let that dissuade you from attending.  The faculty list is comprehensive and the topics timely.

Plus, it’s at a winery.

Here are some of the topics:

The Effective Use of Criminal Discovery: Tactics for the Defense and the Government
Litigating Prosecutorial Conduct: The Line Between Ethics and Tactics
The Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (FCPA) and Other International Bribery Crimes: When Other Nations Join the Enforcement Party
Supreme Court Update and Other Notable Developments in Criminal Law
A View from the Top: A Look at Federal Law Enforcement Initiatives
You Can’t Always Get What You Want: Sentencing Issues in Economic Crimes
and the Limitations of USSG § 2B1.1
White Collar Criminal Enforcement: Is the Government More Willing Than Ever To Go To Trial?

 


Talk, Talk, Talk: Federal Criminal Discovery

Nice tie.

Nice tie.

Two different audiences — CJA criminal defense lawyers and Birmingham corporate and non-profit leaders — heard my thoughts, hopefully helpful ones, about white-collar crime and federal criminal discovery.

As part of an annual continuing legal education event sponsored by the Office of the Federal Public Defender for the Northern District of Alabama on December 12 , 2014, we discussed “Discovery In Complex Criminal Cases.” Kevin Butler heads up the Northern District’s FPD office and does a great job.  (We interviewed Kevin here).  Read more about the Federal Public Defender’s Office here.

This week, I participated in a white-collar crime panel for the 2014-2015 class of Leadership Birmingham,  a worthwhile organization. The panel was moderated by John Carroll, former United States Magistrate Judge, former Dean of Cumberland Law School and current Director of the Alabama Ethics Commission. White-collar lawyers Anthony Joseph and John Lentine joined me on the panel. Read more about Leadership Birmingham here.

Here’s the press release: white collar crime