SAC Trader Seeks Access To Some Witnesses In SEC Civil Case – Law Blog – WSJ

In parallel proceedings, the civil case is frequently stayed pending the outcome of the criminal case.  Sometimes, the stay can significantly hamper the trial preparation of a defendant in the criminal proceeding (for example, by restricting access to cooperating witnesses).    SAC Trader Seeks Access To Some Witnesses In SEC Civil Case – Law Blog – WSJ

How does the court best balance these principles?


Closing Arguments In The Whitey Bulger Trial

Closing arguments in the Whitey Bulger trial here: Closing Arguments in Bulger Trial
The argument that the Government witnesses were “paid” with leniency rings true enough but, with guys nicknamed “The Executioner” and the like, the jury can discount a good bit and still come out with a conviction.
A fascinating trial, though, with an old-school gloss: no emails, no texts, no high-def surveillance. Just guys in track suits, talking about murder — and often committing it.




Touree and the Jury

This story about the Tourre jurors — http://dealbook.nytimes.com/2013/08/02/in-complex-trading-case-jurors-focused-on-greed/?nl=todaysheadlines&emc=edit_th_20130803&_r=1& — reveals the power of a “Wall Street greed” jury argument, even where the defendant was both low-ranking and apparently likable to the jury. One wonders, though, about the extent to which asking jurors to punish an abstraction — which, after all, is what “Wall Street greed” is — vitiates the requirement that as to a specific individual the Government prove each element (whether by a preponderance standard, as here, or by a reasonable-doubt standard, had this been a criminal case)


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Jack Sharman