• Impeachment,  Public Corruption

    Impeachment Lessons and The Midnight Special

    This post will eventually test your affinity for the 1970s, which featured both Richard Nixon and The Midnight Special. The Special was formative in my teenage years, which explains a great deal. But first, many thanks to the Network of Trial Law Firms for the opportunity to speak in New York on “Impeachment Lessons for Internal Investigations”: People sometimes ask for good basic texts about impeachment generally.  Here are a few suggestions: Impeachment: A Handbook by Charles Black.  This slender, clear, nuanced volume is where you should start. As noted by Lawfare blog: The most important book ever written on presidential impeachment is only 69 pages long. Charles Black, Jr.,’s Impeachment:…

  • Cocktails

    Gin Van, Joan Collins and Rare Earth

    Friday is upon us, so a few notes about cocktails. The cocktail snob is suffering a (deserved) backlash, as Robert O. Simonson of the New York Times points out in When Bad Drinks Go Good: Just as the cocktail renaissance has brought renewed fame to classics like the martini, the Manhattan and the Negroni, it has heaped fresh infamy on a rogues’ gallery of less classy concoctions, most of which emerged during the final decades of the last century. Now a backlash of sorts has begun, as some high-end bartenders apply their skills to a new challenge: doing bad drinks well. Bars like Holiday Cocktail Lounge in New York; Pépé Le Moko…

  • Crime Fiction,  Film,  Privilege,  Trials, Judges and Jurors

    White-Collar Motive, Gun Crazy Movie

    In 1950, producers Frank and Maurice King released Gun Crazy, a sometimes surreal Bonnie-and-Clyde story with an introverted, pacifist gun lover (Barton Tare, played by John Dall) and an English femme fatale sharpshooter  (Annie Laurie Starr, played by Peggy Cummins).  Carried forward by his lust for and fascination with Annie, the non-violent Bart — without thinking or planning — becomes a robber and, eventually, an accessory to murder. A classic American film noir, Gun Crazy has merited a book (Eddie Mueller’s Gun Crazy: The Origin of American Outlaw Cinema) and much commentary by film buffs.  It also gives us insight into a common question in white-collar cases: “Why did he [or she, but usually…

  • Search Warrants

    Search Warrants and Russia Raids

    The execution of a search warrant on a residence owned by Paul Manafort, President Trump’s former campaign director, raises some interesting questions.  Search warrants are rarely necessary in white-collar cases, yet their use seems to be more and more common. Here was my take on Brian Williams’s MSNBC show The 11th Hour: As I told Michael Schmidt of the New York Times: “A search warrant is very bracing for the person who is being searched,” said Jack Sharman, the former special counsel to the House Banking Committee during its Whitewater investigation of President Bill Clinton in the 1990s. “It’s very invasive and sends a loud statement from the prosecutors to the…

  • Cocktails

    Summer Crime, “Young Lawyers,” Martinis

    Summer’s heat is fully upon us.  Let us take a moment for crime fiction and cocktails. For recent crime-fiction releases, take a look at Midmonth Book Notes  from The Poisoned Pen bookstore. Also, here is a useful “review of reviewers” from The Rap Sheet blog.  And, for the visually-oriented, The Rap Sheet has a YouTube channel.  One clip I found there was for a show called “The Young Lawyers,” which ran from 1969 to 1971 and which I vaguely recall.  As described by IMDb: David Barrett [a young-looking Lee J. Cobb] heads an organization in Boston that supports poor and indigent clients with the aid of young lawyers, Aaron Silverman is the young…

  • Social Media

    Booze Beats Law: Subscribe to White Collar Wire

    Please take a moment to subscribe to White Collar Wire’s email newsletter.  You’ll get notice of articles before anyone else in the Western world. Just look to the left where it says, very helpfully: Subscribe to our Newsletter Enter your email address and press the “Subscribe” button with the unnecessary exclamation point. If you are a mission-statement type, here’s ours: This is a blog about business crime.  We post stories about news, cases, judicial opinions, practical tips and scholarly work regarding white-collar criminal and civil enforcement, grand jury investigations and regulatory compliance.  We want to be useful to businesspeople, internal counsel, defense lawyers in private practice, prosecutors and law-school teachers.…

  • Books,  Literature

    13 Books Every White-Collar Lawyer Should Read

    Of the making of lists of books, there shall be no end. Nevertheless, here is one more. Set out below are 13 works that every white-collar lawyer – defense counsel, prosecutor or judge – should read. Why take on such a presumptuous project? Three good reasons. First, lists start conversations. Although law is (or was) a “learned profession,” relatively few lawyers in my experience have read broadly or deeply since college.  The press of work does not allow otherwise.  Our professional learning is utilitarian, narrow, cramped and quickly (or gratefully) forgotten. Second, the proponent of such a list (that is, me) must review, reconsider or even reread works first encountered…

  • Controlled Substances Act,  Drugs,  Trials, Judges and Jurors

    Risk, Reward and Pain: Doctor Lessons from An Opioid Trial

    Opioid medications continue to be in the news, as demonstrated by the recent nationwide state attorneys-general investigation.  This situation only demands more attention from physicians and other healthcare providers who may face significant criminal sanctions. My law partner Brandon Essig recently wrote in Medical Economics: Over the past three decades, opioids have become a standard and effective component of pain management for many practitioners. They are effectively and safely prescribed in every conceivable clinical environment—primary care facilities, hospitals, pain management clinics and even dentist offices. They are prescribed to treat chronic and intractable pain, such as advanced stage cancer pain or severe burns, but they are also prescribed to treat soft…

  • Leadership

    A Meditation On Father’s Day

                            At age 56, I am now four years older than my father was when he died.              For many years, I rarely thought of Daddy.  Primarily, I thought about him every January 6, the anniversary of the day he died. Annually, this is a day upon which my mother and I have the same conversation, rehearsed and hushed.  I loved him, and one might expect me to have thought of him more often, to have honored him, but I did not, at least not until recently.  Before you draw too many conclusions, though, bear in mind that I could not see him clearly.             Have you ever looked…

  • Controlled Substances Act,  Health Care

    Stethoscopes, Handcuffs and Pain

    When does managing pain become a crime? And, what can a healthcare provider do to stay out of trouble in these days of the “opioid epidemic”, new federal legislation and the criminal prosecution of doctors? I make a few suggestions here in Pain Management News: That’s the question many physicians, nurse practitioners (NPs), certified registered nurse anesthetists (CRNAs) and physician assistants (PAs) are asking in the wake of a tidal wave of prosecutions related to pain medicine. This has been partly spurred on by the “opioid epidemic.” There has been a sharp spike in convictions—either by guilty plea or by conviction after a trial—of health care professionals involved in pain medicine.…